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 ARTICLE
Year : 1978  |  Volume : 24  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 68-90

Cancerology: Science or non-science?- (a plea for cancerrealism)


Department of Anatomy, Seth G.S. Medical College, Bombay-400 012, India

Correspondence Address:
M L Kothari
Department of Anatomy, Seth G.S. Medical College, Bombay-400 012
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 722608

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Cancerology is, by all counts, a non-science, which may be defined as a so-called scientific pursuit in the teeth of obvious proofs to the contrary. Not one facet of current cancerology-etiology, diagnosis, therapy, prevention, and its latest fad, immunology ­enjoys any clear, rational basis. No wonder that the outcome of the whole gargantuan effort is "precisely nil", with possibly more people living on, than dying of, cancer. The pathway to the logical­ly acceptable and comprehensible science is simple-to give cancer its due place in biology, to give the cancer cell its rightful place of but a form of cytodifferentiation, and to give the cancer therapist the supremely relevant role of a palliator. To talk of cancer cure is to deny - the cytosomatic reality that cancer is one's own flesh and blood. Being a part of one's self, cancer need not always be treated. I f a therapist has the right and obligation to diagnose, treat, and prognose upon a cancer patient, he has, hitherto unrecognized, equal right and obligation, not to do one or all of these. Cancer­realism offered in this article can guide a therapist to this often necessary path of inaction.






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Online since 12th February '04
© 2004 - Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
Official Publication of the Staff Society of the Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Mumbai, India
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