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 REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2002  |  Volume : 48  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 322-6

Attributing death to cancer: cause-specific survival estimation.


Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Regional Cancer Centre, Medical College P.O., Trivandrum - 695 011, India. , India

Correspondence Address:
A Mathew
Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Regional Cancer Centre, Medical College P.O., Trivandrum - 695 011, India.
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 12571396

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Cancer survival estimation is an important part of assessing the overall strength of cancer care in a region. Generally, the death of a patient is taken as the end point in estimation of overall survival. When calculating the overall survival, the cause of death is not taken into account. With increasing demand for better survival of cancer patients it is important for clinicians and researchers to know about survival statistics due to disease of interest, i.e. net survival. It is also important to choose the best method for estimating net survival. Increase in the use of computer programmes has made it possible to carry out statistical analysis without guidance from a bio-statistician. This is of prime importance in third- world countries as there are a few trained bio-statisticians to guide clinicians and researchers. The present communication describes current methods used to estimate net survival such as cause-specific survival and relative survival. The limitation of estimation of cause-specific survival particularly in India and the usefulness of relative survival are discussed. The various sources for estimating cancer survival are also discussed. As survival-estimates are to be projected on to the population at large, it becomes important to measure the variation of the estimates, and thus confidence intervals are used. Rothman's confidence interval gives the most satisfactory result for survival estimate.






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Online since 12th February '04
2004 - Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
Official Publication of the Staff Society of the Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Mumbai, India
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow