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 SPECIAL ARTICLE
Year : 2003  |  Volume : 49  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 141-7

Smallpox: clinical highlights and considerations for vaccination.


Department of Family Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, ECMC Clinical Center, 462 Grider Street, Buffalo, New York 14215, USA. , USA

Correspondence Address:
M C Mahoney
Department of Family Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, ECMC Clinical Center, 462 Grider Street, Buffalo, New York 14215, USA.
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 12867690

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Smallpox virus has gained considerable attention as a potential bioterrorism agent. Recommendations for smallpox (vaccinia) vaccination presume a low risk for use of smallpox as a terrorist biological agent and vaccination is currently recommended for selected groups of individuals such as health care workers, public health authorities, and emergency/rescue workers, among others. Information about adverse reactions to the smallpox vaccine is based upon studies completed during the 1950s and 1960s. The prevalence of various diseases has changed over the last four decades and new disease entities have been described during this period. The smallpox vaccination may be contra-indicated in many of these conditions. This has made pre-screening of potential vaccines necessary. It is believed that at present, the risks of vaccine-associated complications far outweigh the potential benefits of vaccination in the general population.






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Online since 12th February '04
2004 - Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
Official Publication of the Staff Society of the Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Mumbai, India
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow