Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
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 CASE REPORT
Year : 2004  |  Volume : 50  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 55-56

A case of gallstone ileus with an unusual impaction site and spontaneous evacuation


Departments of Gastroenterology, 251 Hellenic Air Force and Veterans General Hospital, Athens, Greece

Correspondence Address:
G K Anagnostopoulos
Departments of Gastroenterology, 251 Hellenic Air Force and Veterans General Hospital, Athens
Greece
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 15048001

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Gallstone ileus is an unusual cause of colonic obstruction. The formation of a fistula between the gall bladder and the bowel wall may allow a gallstone to enter the intestinal tract. Plain abdominal films, abdominal ultrasound and abdominal computed tomography aid in the diagnosis. Although surgery is the treatment of choice in cases of colonic gallstone ileus, colonoscopic removal of the impacted stone should be attempted. We describe the case of an 85-year-old man who presented with symptoms and signs of large bowel obstruction. Diagnostic evaluation revealed a large gallstone impacted in the sigmoid colon, which is a rather unusual impaction site. Despite our efforts we could not extract the stone endoscopically, mainly due to its large size. Yet, despite its large size, the stone was spontaneously evacuated a few hours later.






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Online since 12th February '04
2004 - Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
Official Publication of the Staff Society of the Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Mumbai, India
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow