Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
 Open access journal indexed with Index Medicus & ISI's SCI  
Users online: 2355  
Home | Subscribe | Feedback | Login 
About Latest Articles Back-Issues Article Submission Resources Sections Etcetera Contact
 
  NAVIGATE Here 
 ::   Next article
 ::   Previous article
 ::   Table of Contents

 RESOURCE Links
 ::   Similar in PUBMED
 ::  Search Pubmed for
 ::  Search in Google Scholar for
 ::Related articles
 ::   Citation Manager
 ::   Access Statistics
 ::   Reader Comments
 ::   Email Alert *
 ::   Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed6196    
    Printed164    
    Emailed9    
    PDF Downloaded165    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal


 

 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2004  |  Volume : 50  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 253-256

Use of live nonhuman primates in research in Asia


Synalsvagen 10, SE 757 57 Uppsala, Sweden

Correspondence Address:
J Hagelin
Synalsvagen 10, SE 757 57 Uppsala
Sweden
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 15623964

Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

Background: Use of live non-human primates (NHPs) in biomedical research is a controversial issue in many parts of the world. Recent use of NHPs in research in Asian countries was surveyed. Aim: To elucidate the use of NHPs in research in Asian countries. Settings and design: The peer-reviewed literature was sampled according to the species used, area of research, research class and geographic location. Articles derived from database searches were scrutinised. Methods and Material: Studies were identified from the PrimateLit database. Results and Conclusion: Results suggested that NHP research was conducted in 16 countries, of which Japan accounted for two-thirds. About 55% of studies involved use of live animals, whereas the remaining 45% used some lower level of biological material. More than 70% of the studies using live NHPs included use of Old World monkeys. M. fuscata (18%), M. mulatta (17%) and M. fascicularis (10%) were the three most commonly used species. The most common research areas were neuroscience (44%), conservation (14%) and behaviour (11%). Due to high demand for NHPs, there is room for increased breeding of NHPs to be used for research in Asian countries.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article

Online since 12th February '04
2004 - Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
Official Publication of the Staff Society of the Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Mumbai, India
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow