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IMAGES IN RADIOLOGY
Year : 2006  |  Volume : 52  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 139

Rectal ears


Department of Radio Diagnosis, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education & Research Sector-12, Chandigarh -160012, India

Correspondence Address:
Akshay Kumar Saxena
Department of Radio Diagnosis, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education & Research Sector-12, Chandigarh -160012
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 16679681

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How to cite this article:
Saxena AK, Choudhary S. Rectal ears. J Postgrad Med 2006;52:139

How to cite this URL:
Saxena AK, Choudhary S. Rectal ears. J Postgrad Med [serial online] 2006 [cited 2019 Jul 21];52:139. Available from: http://www.jpgmonline.com/text.asp?2006/52/2/139/25162


A three month old female child with history of constipation since birth was referred to our department for evaluation for suspected Hirschsprung's disease. During the contrast enema study, transient protrusions of both lateral walls (arrows) were noted synchronous with contraction of levator ani muscles [Figure - 1]. These features are suggestive of rectal "ears" and are similar to more familiar bladder "ears" noted during micturating cystourethrography.

The upper third of rectum is covered by peritoneum anteriorly and on both lateral aspects while the middle third has is covered by peritoneum only anteriorly. The lower third of rectum is extraperitoneal. It is postulated that variant peritoneal reflections around the rectum can allow more mobility than normal.[1] This allows the contracting levator ani muscles to pull rectum far anteriorly with transient herniation into the deep inguinal ring.

From a clinical view point, rectal "ears" are of no significance. Care should be taken not to mistake them for diverticulae.

 
  References Top

1.Morrison SC. Rectal "ears". Pediatr Radiol 2003;33:658-9.  Back to cited text no. 1    


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Online since 12th February '04
2004 - Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
Official Publication of the Staff Society of the Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Mumbai, India
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow