Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
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 REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2006  |  Volume : 52  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 210-217

Chemokines and chemokine receptors in HIV infection: Role in pathogenesis and therapeutics


Department of Internal Medicine, PGIMER, Chandigarh - 160 012, Punjab, India

Correspondence Address:
A Wanchu
Department of Internal Medicine, PGIMER, Chandigarh - 160 012, Punjab
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 16855325

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Chemokines are known to function as regulatory molecules in leukocyte maturation, traffic, homing of lymphocytes and in the development of lymphoid tissues. Besides these functions in the immune system, certain chemokines and their receptors are involved in HIV pathogenesis. In order to infect a target cell, the HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 has to interact with the cellular receptor CD-4 and co-receptor, CC or CXC chemokine receptors. Genetic findings have yielded major insights into the in vivo roles of individual co-receptors and their ligands in providing resistance to HIV infection. Mutations in chemokine receptor genes are associated with protection against HIV infections and also involved in delayed progression to AIDS in infected individuals. Blocking of chemokine receptors interrupts HIV infection in vitro and this offers new options for therapeutic strategies. Approaches have been made to study the CCR-5 inhibitors as antiviral therapies and possibly as components of a topical microbicide to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission. Immune strategies aimed at generating anti-CCR-5 antibodies at the level of the genital mucosa might be feasible and represent a strategy to induce mucosal HIV- protective immunity. It also remains to be seen how these types of agents will act in synergy with existing HIV-1 targeted anti viral, or those currently in developments. Beyond providing new perspectives in fundamental aspects of the HIV-1 transmission and pathogenesis, chemokines and their receptors suggest new areas for developing novel therapeutic and preventive strategies against HIV infections. Studies in this review were identified through a search for relevant literature in the pubmed database of the national library of medicine. In this review, some developments in chemokine research with particular focus on their roles in HIV pathogenesis, resistance and therapeutic applications have been discussed.






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Online since 12th February '04
2004 - Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
Official Publication of the Staff Society of the Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Mumbai, India
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow