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 CASE REPORT
Year : 2008  |  Volume : 54  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 206-208

Recurrence of primary hyperoxaluria: An avoidable catastrophe following kidney transplant


1 Department of Pathology, Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Acharya Dhonde Marg, Parel, Mumbai - 400 012, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Nephrology, Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Acharya Dhonde Marg, Parel, Mumbai - 400 012, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
C Madiwale
Department of Pathology, Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Acharya Dhonde Marg, Parel, Mumbai - 400 012, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0022-3859.41803

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Primary hyperoxaluria is a rare autosomal recessive disease due to deficiency of an oxalate-metabolizing liver enzyme, which results in nephrolithiasis and renal failure. Concomitant liver and kidney transplant is recommended as isolated kidney transplant is inevitably complicated by recurrence of the disease. We present a 25-year-old man with end-stage nephrolithiatic renal disease who underwent bilateral nephrectomy, followed by kidney transplantation. There was progressive worsening of kidney function two weeks post transplant. Review of nephrectomy and transplant kidney biopsy showed abundant calcium oxalate crystals and further workup revealed hyperoxaluria, which was previously unsuspected. Later he developed fever, breathlessness, hemiparesis and died 10 weeks after transplant. Autopsy revealed multi-organ deposits of oxalate crystals as well as widespread zygomycosis. This case emphasizes the need for careful pre-transplant evaluation of patients with renal calculus disease in order to exclude primary hyperoxaluria.






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Online since 12th February '04
2004 - Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
Official Publication of the Staff Society of the Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Mumbai, India
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow