Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
 Open access journal indexed with Index Medicus & ISI's SCI  
Users online: 2202  
Home | Subscribe | Feedback | Login 
About Latest Articles Back-Issues Article Submission Resources Sections Etcetera Contact
 
  NAVIGATE Here 
 ::   Next article
 ::   Previous article
 ::   Table of Contents

 RESOURCE Links
 ::   Similar in PUBMED
 ::  Search Pubmed for
 ::  Search in Google Scholar for
 ::Related articles
 ::   Citation Manager
 ::   Access Statistics
 ::   Reader Comments
 ::   Email Alert *
 ::   Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed27465    
    Printed546    
    Emailed20    
    PDF Downloaded663    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 34    

Recommend this journal


 

 SYMPOSIUM: VIOLENCE AGAINST CHILDREN AND WOMEN
Year : 2008  |  Volume : 54  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 287-293

Childhood trauma and psychosis: Evidence, pathways, and implications


1 Early Intervention Service, Lancashire Care NHS Foundation Trust, Ground Floor, Daiseyfield Mill, Appleby Road, Blackburn BB1 3BL; Doctoral Programme in Clinical Psychology, Institute for Health Research, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YT, United Kingdom
2 Department of Psychology, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, NewZealand

Correspondence Address:
J Read
Department of Psychology, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland
NewZealand
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 18953148

Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

There is currently a growing body of research examining environmental factors in the etiology of psychosis. Much recent interest has focused on the relationship between childhood trauma and the risk of developing psychotic experiences later in life. Numerous studies of psychiatric patients where the majority are diagnosed psychotic indicate that the prevalence of traumatic experiences in this group is high. This body of research now includes many large-scale population-based studies controlling for possible mediating variables, which together provide persuasive evidence of a dose-response association and are indicative of a causal relationship. Several psychological and biological models have been proposed which offer credible accounts of the processes by which trauma may increase risk of psychotic experience. Clinically it is imperative to routinely enquire about traumatic experiences, to respond appropriately and to offer psychosocial treatments to those who report traumatic life events in the context of psychotic experiences.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article

Online since 12th February '04
2004 - Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
Official Publication of the Staff Society of the Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Mumbai, India
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow