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Year : 2011  |  Volume : 57  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 138-140

Fresh look at the doppler changes in pregnancies with placental-based complications


Department of Radiology, Nowrosjee Wadia Hospital, Parel, Mumbai, India

Correspondence Address:
S Dikshit
Department of Radiology, Nowrosjee Wadia Hospital, Parel, Mumbai
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0022-3859.81880

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Placental-based complications of pregnancy can be classified as acute and chronic. An example of acute placental complication is abruptio placenta. The chronic placental complications include pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) and idiopathic Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). The fetus is at risk for perinatal complications in both acute and chronic conditions. Here we take a look at the natural history of the Doppler parameters in chronic conditions. The techniques used for assessing the fetal well-being include, clinical methods, biophysical tests, conventional ultrasonography, and fetal Doppler studies. Arterial Doppler studies are used to assess the well-being of the fetus and to determine the timing of delivery. However, arterial Dopplers predict only the subset of fetuses at risk of having perinatal complications. Venous Dopplers have been used to improve upon the prognostication. However, by the time the commonly used venous Doppler signs, that is, 'A' wave reversal in ductus venosus (DV) is present, the fetus is likely to be already compromised. The fetus tries to adapt to the environment of deprivation by making a series of changes in the umbilical artery circulation, cerebral circulation, and hepatic circulation. As a result of these adaptations, the fetus overcomes the state of chronic hypoxia. This article takes a look at these changes and also the effect of these adaptations. It is suggested that serial comparisons of the venous flow characteristics of the DV and inferior vena cava (IVC) can provide an early indication of the impending decompensation and can be used to predict the time the delivery.






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Online since 12th February '04
2004 - Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
Official Publication of the Staff Society of the Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Mumbai, India
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow