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 CASE REPORT
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 60  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 69-71

Xanthoma disseminatum: A progressive case with multisystem involvement


1 Department of Dermatology, Andrology and Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufiya University, Menoufiya, Egypt
2 Department of Ear, Nose, Throat, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufiya University, Menoufiya, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
O A Bakry
Department of Dermatology, Andrology and Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufiya University, Menoufiya
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0022-3859.128817

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Xanthoma disseminatum (XD) is a rare, benign, non-Langerhans cell histiocytic disorder. The pathogenesis is not clear. It manifests with multiple, grouped, red-brown to yellow papules and nodules involving the skin, mucous membranes, and internal organs. We present a case of progressive XD in a 10-year-old male child. The patient presented with progressive, bilateral and symmetrical, reddish-brown, coalescent papules on the neck, around both eyes and all over his trunk and extremities. Skin lesions were accompanied by blurred vision and hoarseness of voice. Examination revealed xanthomatous infiltration of cornea, oral, pharyngeal, and laryngeal mucosae. The patient had diabetes insipidus that was diagnosed 2 years before the appearance of skin lesions. Medical treatment with corticosteroids (20 mg/day) and azathioprine (2 mg/kg/day) did not stop the disease progression.






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Online since 12th February '04
2004 - Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
Official Publication of the Staff Society of the Seth GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Mumbai, India
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow