Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
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ARTICLE
 
 
Year : 1977  |  Volume : 23  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 73-76  

Propane 1, 2-diol (propylene glycol): A new phlogistic agent in mice

Kala M Mogre1, SR Amladi1, PD Soman2, UK Sheth1,  
1 Department of Pharmacology, Seth G. S. Medical College, Parel, Bombay-400012, India
2 Radiopharmaceutical Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, India

Correspondence Address:
Kala M Mogre
Department of Pharmacology, Seth G. S. Medical College, Parel, Bombay-400012
India

Abstract

Propane 1, 2-diol (CH 3 -CHOH. CH 2 OH mol. wt. 76.10), a low molecular weight substance produced well defined inflammatory edema in hind paw of mice. Edema was concentration dependent. Submaximal edema occurred with 50% propylene glycol. Hydro­cortisone, aspirin, phenylbutazone, indomethacin given orally were significantly effective against this edema. There was also an increase in the capillary permeability with propylene glycol edema. Lack of effect of chlorpheniramine, cyproheptadine and polymyxin B on edema suggest that histamine and serotonin are not involved in the mechnism of propylene glycol edema.



How to cite this article:
Mogre KM, Amladi S R, Soman P D, Sheth U K. Propane 1, 2-diol (propylene glycol): A new phlogistic agent in mice.J Postgrad Med 1977;23:73-76


How to cite this URL:
Mogre KM, Amladi S R, Soman P D, Sheth U K. Propane 1, 2-diol (propylene glycol): A new phlogistic agent in mice. J Postgrad Med [serial online] 1977 [cited 2022 Dec 8 ];23:73-76
Available from: https://www.jpgmonline.com/text.asp?1977/23/2/73/42797


Full Text

 Introduction



Propane 1, 2-diol (CH 3 -CHOH. CH 2 OH., mol. wt. 76.10), propylene glycol was found to possess prostaglandin-like activity when tested against heat induced protein denaturation (unpublished ob­servation). Since prostaglandins have been claimed to be involved in inflamma­tory processes, [3] it was thought worth­while to investigate if propylene glycol had any phlogistic activity in mice, and to study response to various known anti-­inflammatory agents.

 Material and Methods



Hind Paw Edema

White mice of either sex, weighing between 20-30 gms, were used. Each group consisted of 10 mice.

(a) Extent of edema:

The left hind paw was injected sub­cutaneously in the plantar pedis with 0.1 ml of 50% concentration of propylene glycol in normal saline. Two hours later the mice were sacrificed with ether and both paws were amputated at tarsotibial joint and weighed on torsion balance. Difference in the weight of two paws was taken as the weight of the edema.

(b) Dose-effect relationship:

The edema was produced with 10, 25, 50 and 100% concentration of propylene elvcol.

(c) Time-course of edema:

This was studied with 50% concentration of propylene glycol.

(d) Effect of anti-inflammatory drugs:

The effect of hydrocortisone, aspirin, phenylbutazone and indomethacin was studied against propylene glycol edema. Drugs were given orally one hour before the injection of propylene glycol.

(e) Effect on capillary permeability:

To observe the increase in capillary permeability involved in acute inflamma­tory process, [1] intravenous injection of 0.1 ml of 0.5% concentration of Evans Blue was given and extravasation of the dye was observed in edematous paw.

(f) Role of chemical mediators:

In order to elucidate the role of pro­bable mediators alleged in increasing capillary permeability, [2] the following compounds were tested.

(i) Chlorpheniramine maleate, 5 mg/ kg, orally one hour before the injection of propylene glycol.

(ii) Polymyxin-B, 5 mg/kg, intra­peritoneally for three consecutive days.

(iii) Cyproheptadine, 5 mg/kg, orally one hour before the injection of propy­lene glycol.

 Results



Propylene glycol was found to in­duce edema in mouse hind paw. Edema was concentration dependent. Submaxi­mal edema occurred with 50% concentra­tion [Figure 1],[Figure 2]. Time course of edema sug­gests that peak edema occurred at 2 hours. R 50 (Period of 50% recovery in Hydrocortisone, aspirin, phenylbuta­zone and indomethacin given orally were significantly effective against propylene glycol edema. The maximum inhibition of edema occurred with hydrocortisone, 100 mg/kg, aspirin 400 mg/kg, phenyl­butazone 200 mg/kg and indomethacin 25 mg/kg [Table 1].

The extravasation of Evans Blue in edematous paw indicated increase in capillary permeability with propylene glycol edema. Chlorpheniramine (antihis­tamine); polymyxin B (histamine, 5-HT depleter) and Cyproheptadine did not affect the edema [Table 2].

 Discussion



Propylene glycol produced well defined inflammatory edema in mice. Opti­mum edema was produced with 50% con­centration of propylene glycol. Peak edema occurred at 2 hour. R 50 was 30 hours; complete recovery occurred after 10 days. There was increase in the capil­lary permeability in propylene glycol edema but lack of effect of chlorphenira­mine, cyprolheptadine and polymyxin-B suggests that histamine and serotonin are not involved in the mechanism of in­crease in capillary permeability. Hydro cortisone, aspirin, phenylbutazone and indomethacin were significantly effective in inhibiting the edema but the doses re­quired to suppress the edema are larger than those to suppress carageenin edema. (our unpublished observations). It was our objective to replace carrageenin which needs to be imported for ex­perimental studies by a new phlogistic agent and propylene glycol may serve the purpose provided one keeps into account that doses of standard anti-inflammatory agents required to suppress the edema are proportionately much larger.

References

1Brown, D. M. and Robson, R. D.: Effect of anti-inflammatory agents on capillary permeability and edema formation. Na­ture., 202: 812-813, 1964.
2Spector, W. G. and Willoughby, D. A.: Vasoactive amines in acute inflammation. Ann. New York Acad. Sci. 116: 839-846, 1964.
3Vane, J. R.: Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis as a mechanism of action for aspirin like drugs. Nature New Biology,231: 232-235, 1971.

 
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