Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
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Year : 1990  |  Volume : 36  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 143-6  

The nature of bones and joints: a new perspective.

ML Kothari, LA Mehta, M Natrajan 
 Department of Anatomy, Seth G. S. Medical College, Parel, Bombay, Maharashtra.

Correspondence Address:
M L Kothari
Department of Anatomy, Seth G. S. Medical College, Parel, Bombay, Maharashtra.

In human ontogeny recapitulating phylogeny, bones arrive late on the scene--long after neurogenesis, musculogenesis, organogenesis and so on are over--as islands of ossification in an ocean of collagen. This study confirms this developmental sequence by demonstrating, in cadavers, the rather independent nature of bone, to which nothing--muscle, tendon, ligament or articular cartilage--is attached. Bone is like the air in a tubeless tyre; it gives rigidity and shape to the tyre, and in return takes the shape of the tyre. The tibia, for example, is the bony tissue that is contained in tyre-like casing made of peritibial soft tissues whose inner limit is the periosteum, which continues proximally and distally as capsules of knee/ankle joint, and to which only are the articular cartilages of the knee and ankle attached, being clearly free from the bones. This study also exposes the truer nature of a joint wherein the articular cartilage assumes anatomic and physiologic significance hitherto unthought of.


How to cite this article:
Kothari M L, Mehta L A, Natrajan M. The nature of bones and joints: a new perspective. J Postgrad Med 1990;36:143-6


How to cite this URL:
Kothari M L, Mehta L A, Natrajan M. The nature of bones and joints: a new perspective. J Postgrad Med [serial online] 1990 [cited 2022 Jun 25 ];36:143-6
Available from: https://www.jpgmonline.com/article.asp?issn=0022-3859;year=1990;volume=36;issue=3;spage=143;epage=6;aulast=Kothari;type=0


 
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