Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
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Year : 2014  |  Volume : 60  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 417-418  

Authors' reply

N Rajkumari1, AK Gupta2, P Mathur1, V Trikha3, V Sharma3, K Farooque3, MC Misra4,  
1 Department of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology Division, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
2 Hospital Infection Control, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
3 Department of Orthopaedics, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
4 Department of Surgery, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. P Mathur
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology Division, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
India




How to cite this article:
Rajkumari N, Gupta A K, Mathur P, Trikha V, Sharma V, Farooque K, Misra M C. Authors' reply.J Postgrad Med 2014;60:417-418


How to cite this URL:
Rajkumari N, Gupta A K, Mathur P, Trikha V, Sharma V, Farooque K, Misra M C. Authors' reply. J Postgrad Med [serial online] 2014 [cited 2021 Dec 6 ];60:417-418
Available from: https://www.jpgmonline.com/text.asp?2014/60/4/417/143993


Full Text

Sir

We agree with Yasri S et al. that co-morbidities like malignancy, diabetes mellitus, transfusion, etc and extrinsic factors like prophylactic antibiotic therapy, contamination level of the wound, open surgery and length of surgery can influence the development of SSIs. [1],[2] Trauma patients by and large are a unique cohort of predominantly young males, with no underlying illnesses and predominantly in the prime of their economically productive age in this country. None of the post-operative patients in this study had co-morbidities like diabetes mellitus or malignancy, except one who had diabetes. The latter patient did not develop a surgical site infection. The impact of perioperative antibiotic therapy has been evaluated by other studies (including ours) and shown to be useful. [3],[4] Level of wound contamination and type of SSI were addressed in our study; but the objective was to evaluate utility of wound surveillance. We agree that several factors that impact SSI need to be addressed.

References

1Yasri S, Wiwanitkit V. Surgical site infections in orthopedic trauma surgeries. J Postgrad Med 2014;60:417.
2Alp E, Altun D, Ulu-Kilic A, Elmali F. What really affects surgical site infection rates in general surgery in a developing country? J Infect Public Health 2014;7:445-9.
3Smith SC, Heal CF, Buttner PG. Prevention of surgical site infection in lower limb skin lesion excisions with single dose oral antibiotic prophylaxis: A prospective randomised placebo-controlled double-blind trial. BMJ Open 2014;4:e005270.
4Mathur P, Trikha V, Farooque K, Sharma V, Jain N, Bhardwaj N, et al. Implementation of a short course of prophylactic antibiotic treatment for prevention of postoperative infections in clean orthopaedic surgeries. Indian J Med Res 2013;137:111-6.

 
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