Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
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Year : 2016  |  Volume : 62  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 150-156  

Assessing the reliability of microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests in malaria diagnosis in areas with varying parasite density among older children and adult patients in Nigeria

EE Ayogu1, CV Ukwe2, EO Nna3 
1 Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Management, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nigeria; Pharmacy Unit, District Hospital Nsukka, Ministry of Health, Nsukka, Nigeria
2 Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Management, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria
3 Safety Moleular Pathology Laboratory, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, Enugu State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
E E Ayogu
Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Management, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nigeria; Pharmacy Unit, District Hospital Nsukka, Ministry of Health, Nsukka
Nigeria

Background: Current malaria control strategies are based on early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of malaria cases. The study aimed at comparing the performance of blood film microscopy and rapid diagnostic test (RDT) in Plasmodium falciparum detection in patients ≥6 years of age. Materials and Methods: A total of 154 consecutive pyretic patients aged 6-62 years were enrolled, sampled, and tested for malaria using RDT (first response) and microscopy by Giemsa staining. Genomic DNA was extracted after saponin hemolysis and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect Plasmodium falciparum. The endpoints were sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV). Results: Of the 154 patients, 80 (51.9%) had fever of ≥37.5°C. 106 (68.8%) were positive by First response® , 132 (85.7%) by microscopy, and 121 (78.6%) by PCR. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of first response compared to microscopic method were 82.2%, 100.0%, 100.0%, and 34.3%, respectively, while it was 75.4%, 75.0%, 95.3%, and 31.2%, respectively, when compared to PCR. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the microscopic method compared to PCR were 92.3%, 50.0%, 90.91%, and 54.5%, respectively. There was a significant difference in the performance of RDT and film microscopy methods (P ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: Microscopy performed better and is more reliable than first response (RDT) in areas with low parasite density among patients ≥6 years of age. Rapid diagnostic tests could be useful in aareas with high parasite density as an alternative to smear microscopy


How to cite this article:
Ayogu E E, Ukwe C V, Nna E O. Assessing the reliability of microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests in malaria diagnosis in areas with varying parasite density among older children and adult patients in Nigeria.J Postgrad Med 2016;62:150-156


How to cite this URL:
Ayogu E E, Ukwe C V, Nna E O. Assessing the reliability of microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests in malaria diagnosis in areas with varying parasite density among older children and adult patients in Nigeria. J Postgrad Med [serial online] 2016 [cited 2021 Oct 25 ];62:150-156
Available from: https://www.jpgmonline.com/article.asp?issn=0022-3859;year=2016;volume=62;issue=3;spage=150;epage=156;aulast=Ayogu;type=0


 
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