Journal of Postgraduate Medicine
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
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Year : 2020  |  Volume : 66  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 141-148  

Willingness to quit tobacco and its correlates among Indian tobacco users—Findings from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey India, 2016–17

SS Kar1, P Sivanantham1, T Rehman1, P Chinnakali1, S Thiagarajan2 
1 Department of PSM, JIPMER, Puducherry, India
2 Independent Consultant, Former Professor and Dean, TISS, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
S S Kar
Department of PSM, JIPMER, Puducherry
India

Background: Willingness to quit in a tobacco user forms the basis for future quit attempts and quitting successfully. Objective: To determine the prevalence and correlates of willingness to quit among tobacco users in India using the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS), India, 2016–2017. Methods: GATS, 2016–17 was a multistage geographically clustered sample survey done among 74,037 individuals aged 15 years and above across all the states and two of the Union Territories of India. Data of all those reported using any form of tobacco were studied for past attempts to quit tobacco, advised to quit by a health care provider, and exposure to anti-tobacco messages delivered through various media and the correlation of these with the willingness to quit using multivariate analysis. Results: Of the 21,085 current tobacco users in the survey, 11,679 (52.2%), were willing to quit all forms of tobacco. Multivariate analysis showed that those in younger age groups (OR: 1.39 [1.23–1.56]), higher education levels (OR 1.15 [1.05–1.18]), time of first tobacco use in the day being more than 60 min after waking up in the morning (OR 1.11 [1.03–1.2]), history of attempts to quit in the past 12 months (OR 1.78 [1.69–1.87]), those advised to quit by health care provider in the past 12 months (OR 1.11 [1.06–1.17]), those using single form of tobacco (OR 1.1 [1.05–1.17]), those exposed to anti-tobacco messages in newspapers/magazines (OR 1.1 [1.05–1.17]), and cinemas (1.14 [1.08–1.20]) were more willing to quit compared to their counterparts. Conclusion: Enhanced publicizing of anti-tobacco messages through the currently employed media, and ensuring that doctors give a brief advice to quit during any contact with a tobacco user could improve the willingness to quit and the consequent quit rate, especially among those tobacco users who are in younger age groups and who have attempted to quit earlier.


How to cite this article:
Kar S S, Sivanantham P, Rehman T, Chinnakali P, Thiagarajan S. Willingness to quit tobacco and its correlates among Indian tobacco users—Findings from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey India, 2016–17.J Postgrad Med 2020;66:141-148


How to cite this URL:
Kar S S, Sivanantham P, Rehman T, Chinnakali P, Thiagarajan S. Willingness to quit tobacco and its correlates among Indian tobacco users—Findings from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey India, 2016–17. J Postgrad Med [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Apr 16 ];66:141-148
Available from: https://www.jpgmonline.com/article.asp?issn=0022-3859;year=2020;volume=66;issue=3;spage=141;epage=148;aulast=Kar;type=0


 
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